Awards Season 2018: Unsung But Seen On The Big Screen, Women Overlooked For Oscar - PopcornReel.com

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Friday, February 9, 2018

AWARDS SEASON 2018
The Unsung But Seen: Women On The Big Screen



Betty Gabriel as Georgina in Jordan Peele's "Get Out".  Universal Pictures  

       

by
Omar P.L. Moore/PopcornReel.com        Follow popcornreel on Twitter FOLLOW                                           
Friday, February 9, 2018

Two of the biggest misses on Oscar nominations morning were Betty Gabriel and Vicky Krieps, actors boldly defining both the space of their characters and an intellectual embodiment of their trappings.  Both of their onscreen characters yearn to be free.  One character succeeds, the other does not. 


BETTY GABRIEL
in "Get Out" as Georgina

A phenomenal performance built on a foundation of pain, turbulence and imprisonment.  Betty Gabriel finds the range of Georgina, a housemaid for a white racist family.  Ms. Gabriel reaches deep down within to find Georgina's true self. Georgina is struggling to reclaim her "self".  This is Georgina's brave journey to emancipation from mental slavery.  The actor's excavation is done with unwavering determination, intellect, a flicker of recognition, a Rolodex of facial expressions, pain and hurt.  A series of brief complex pulses are burnished on Ms. Gabriel's face.  Duelling personas in an instant.  The "no no no no no no" refrain is a contradiction of everything Georgina's face says.  Her tears through a wide smile: unforgettable.


VICKY KRIEPS
in "Phantom Thread" as Alma

Like Betty Gabriel, Vicky Krieps displays an intellectual power in her performance as Alma.  She registers disbelief at the antics in the House Of Woodcock.  Alma is independent in 1950s London, which for numerous women not of industry or society was unheard of.  Where Ms. Gabriel's Georgina attempts to reclaim herself Ms. Krieps's Alma is reaffirming herself.  Alma objects at every turn, establishing her identity, singularity and purpose.  "If you get into a staring contest with me you will lose," Alma promises.  This is an important line in the film, and every duel in "Phantom Thread" is akin to a staring contest.  Alma definitely doesn't blink.  Ms. Krieps is commanding.  She offers several subtle looks, observances and sharp glances.  Her facial blankness and sometimes neutral expression resembles Mona Lisa and/or Pat Hitchcock.  Like Ms. Gabriel cerebral overdrive is the main engine for Ms. Krieps, and we can see the wheels spinning.

Vicky Krieps as Alma in Paul Thomas Anderson's drama "Phantom Thread" Laurie Sparham/Focus Features  


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